Viewing entries tagged
Lisa Hunt

School Ties Can Put Parents in a Bind

School Ties Can Put Parents in a Bind

Parents must carefully consider their ongoing responsibility for school fees after divorce.

The cost of private secondary school fees – along with those at the primary schools that act as feeders for them – can cause complications even in intact relationships. When couples are separating or divorced, the question of who is responsible for what percentage of school fees can become significantly complex.

Service of family law documents via social media

Service of family law documents via social media

In a world where the internet and technology have progressed to a place where a relationship can be started with a simple ‘swipe’, ‘like’ or ‘snap’ on social media, it doesn’t seem too hard to believe that a relationship can breakdown over a ‘screenshot’ or ‘instant message’. 

Brangelina split – the custody battle begins

Brangelina split – the custody battle begins

As the entertainment media lights up like a Christmas tree with headlines of the split of power couple ‘Brangelina’ and news that Angelina will file for divorce and ‘physical’ custody of their 6 children, many are left asking what this all means.

Finalising a Property Settlement Agreement

Finalising a Property Settlement Agreement

Separating from your partner can be a painful and disruptive time. While many separated couples may want to distance themselves from each other, it is important to organise arrangements for your children (if you have them) and the division of your property.

Tougher penalties for abuse of Enduring Power of Attorney

Tougher penalties for abuse of Enduring Power of Attorney

On 1 September 2015, the Powers of Attorney Act 2014 (The Act) introduced new civil and criminal penalties for misuse of an enduring power of attorney. The penalties include a fine of up to $91,000 or up to five years imprisonment.

Facebook Introduces 'Legacy Contacts'

Facebook Introduces 'Legacy Contacts'

Congratulations to Facebook for introducing a system to allow some management of a person’s Facebook account after the person’s death.

Should a murderer be allowed to be a beneficiary?

Should a murderer be allowed to be a beneficiary?

In Victoria the law prevents a person who has unlawfully killed another person from benefiting under the deceased person’s will.  This is called the Forfeiture Rule.  An exception applies where the killer is found not guilty by reason of mental impairment.